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My Legislators' Key Votes

How my representative and senator voted on important or interesting measures
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Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7886. gerry.pollet@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786 - 7818 . javier.valdez@leg.wa.gov
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7690. david.frockt@leg.wa.gov
 

Senate Bill 6032: Making supplemental appropriations for the 2017-19 state budget. Passed the House on Final Passage on March 8, 2018 by a vote of 55-44. on March 8, 2018
This is the supplemental budget to adjust the state’s spending plan for the 2017-19 state budget approved by the Legislature last year. The bill was agreed upon by a conference committee of legislative leaders that worked out the differences between earlier versions passed by the House and Senate. The budget agreement was released just one day before the final votes were taken. As passed, the bill raises General Fund spending by $900 million for the current biennium to $44.6 billion, and total spending from all funds by $1.7 billion to $89 billion. The overall supplemental budget package includes a property tax cut of $391 million. for 2019 and $776 million for teacher salaries to comply with the last piece of the state Supreme Court’s 2012 McCleary school funding mandate. The supplemental budget takes into consideration the state’s latest revenue forecast that projects about $1.3 billion more in existing taxes through 2021. No new taxes, notably capital gains income and carbon emissions taxes, are called for in this budget.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6032: Making supplemental appropriations for the 2017-19 state budget. Passed the Senate on Final Passage on March 8, 2018 by a vote of 25-24. on March 8, 2018
The bill passed the Legislature and is on its way to the Governor.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6614: Concerning funding for the support of common schools. Passed the Senate on March 7, 2018 by a vote of 25-23, one member excused. on March 7, 2018
This bill is part of the supplemental budget agreement reached between the House and Senate and would reduce state property taxes by 30 cents per $1,000 in assessed valuation for calendar year 2019, or a total of $391 million in property tax relief. Under the school funding plan approved by the legislature last year, the state property tax rate increased from $1.89 per $1,000 in assessed valuation in 2017 to $2.70 in 2018, resulting in steep increases for many property owners around the state. The property tax cut would be funded by redirecting moneys that would normally go into the state’s reserve fund. A 2011 voter-approved amendment to the state constitution requires that most of the extra money collected during periods of extraordinary general state revenue growth must be deposited into the Budget Stabilization Account—the rainy day fund. This bill, instead, would divert $935 million in state property tax collections for fiscal year 2019 to the Education Legacy Trust Account. Funds in this account are not considered general state revenues for purposes of the rainy day fund. During floor debate, Republicans objected to this move, because they said it was designed to circumvent the two-thirds vote requirement for spending moneys from the reserve fund. They also echoed State Treasurer Duane Davidson’s stated concern that using moneys intended for budget reserves could hurt Washington down the road.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6614: Concerning funding for the support of common schools. Passed the House on Final Passage March 8, 2018 by a vote of 59-39, one member excused. on March 8, 2018
The bill passed the legislature and is on its way to the governor.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6362: Modifying basic education provisions. Passed the House on March 8, 2018 by a vote of 50-48. on March 8, 2018
Also part of the overall supplemental budget agreement, this bill would provide $776 million more for teacher salaries. It would move ahead the schedule for full funding of the increased state salary allocations for school employees to the 2018-19 school year, rather than phasing it in over two school years. In the 2012 McCleary decision, the state Supreme Court ruled that insufficient state funding for basic education unconstitutionally caused districts to rely on local levy funding to support the costs of implementing the state's program. Since the McCleary decision, the Legislature has funded a number of specified enhancements to the basic education program, including transportation; all-day kindergarten; and kindergarten through grade 3 (K-3) class size reductions. Full funding of teacher salary increases, as provided in this bill, would bring the legislature into compliance with the court’s ruling.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6362: Modifying basic education provisions. Passed the Senate on Final Passage on March 8, 2018 by a vote of 25-23, one member excused. on March 8, 2018
The bill had passed the Senate earlier in February, but was amended in the House. The Senate agreed with the House amendments and the bill has now passed the Legislature. It is on its way to the Governor.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 3003: Relating to law enforcement. Passed the House on March 7, 2018 by a vote of 73-25. on March 7, 2018
In January 2018, Washington’s Secretary of State certified Initiative to the Legislature No. 940. dealing with law enforcement, including training, rendering of first aid, criminal liability standards for using deadly force, and investigations. Under the state constitution, the Legislature may enact the initiative, in which case it becomes law. Alternatively, the Legislature may reject it or take no action, or propose an alternative, in which case the initiative along with any alternative is submitted to a vote of the people at the next general election. This bill would amend the initiative to modify the provisions relating to training, the criminal liability standard for use of deadly force, and independent investigations of deadly force incidents. It would make it easier to bring charges against a law enforcement officer for use of deadly force by removing a “malice” requirement and mandates new programs on de-escalation and mental health training for officers. It also requires the state to reimburse a law enforcement officer for reasonable defense costs when he or she is found not guilty or charges are dismissed by reason of justifiable homicide, justifiable use of deadly force, or self-defense, for actions taken while on duty or otherwise within the scope of his or her authority as a law enforcement officer. The bill was passed before passage of the initiative itself but included a provision declaring it null and void should Initiative 940 fail to be subsequently approved by the legislature.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 3003: Relating to law enforcement. Passed the Senate on Final Passage on March 8, 2018 by a vote of 25-24. on March 8, 2018
The bill passed the Senate on final passage and was delivered to the Governor.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Initiated Legislation 940: Initiative by the people to the legislature concerning law enforcement. Passed the Senate on March 8, 2018 by a vote of 25-24. on March 8, 2018
This is the Initiative to the Legislature amended by HB 3003. It requires all law enforcement officers in the state receive violence de- escalation training and mental health training. It also establishes the duty of all law enforcement officers to render first aid to preserve the life of persons whom the officer comes into contact with while carrying out official duties, and provides for a good faith standard, to determine whether a law enforcement officer is criminally liable for the use of deadly force. It also requires independent investigations of certain incidents involving a law enforcement officer's use of deadly force.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Initiated Legislation 940: Initiative by the people to the legislature concerning law enforcement. Passed the House on March 8, 2018 by a vote of 55-43. on March 8, 2018
The Initiative to the Legislature was submitted and passed separately by both houses of the Legislature. It was filed with the Secretary of State to become law.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6617: Concerning records disclosure obligations of the legislative branch. Passed the Senate on February 23, 2018 by a vote of 41-7, one member excused. on February 23, 2018
The bill, as passed, specifies that the state Public Records Act (PRA) would not apply to the Legislature, its houses, members, employees, and agencies. Denial of a legislative records request would only be reviewable by the public records officers of the House or Senate, whose decisions are final and not subject to review by a court. The bill is retroactive, applying to all records requests and lawsuits under the PRA as of the effective date of the act.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6617: Concerning records disclosure obligations of the legislative branch. Passed the House on February 23, 2018 by a vote of 83-14, one member excused. on February 23, 2018
Lawmakers moved this bill from first introduction to final passage in two days without public hearings or committee action. The bill was delivered to the governor, and after nearly a week of public and editorial outcry, Governor Inslee vetoed the bill late Thursday evening. Legislative leaders have indicated that they would not try to override his veto.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6032: Making supplemental appropriations. Passed the Senate on February 23, 2018 by a vote of 25-33, one member excused. on February 23, 2018
This is the Senate version of the supplemental operating budget that would increase General Fund spending for the 2017-19 biennium to $44.8 billion and total spending for all funds to $89.1 billion. It provides nearly $1.0 billion for schools, mostly for increased teacher salaries and offers a $431 million cut in state property taxes for 2019. Property owners around the state are getting much higher property tax bills as a result of changes the Legislature approved last June that raised the state levy rate. No new taxes are called for in this bill. The bill was sent to the House, which continued to work on its version through Friday evening.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6032: Making supplemental appropriations. Passed the House on February 26, 2018 by a vote of 50-46, two members excused. on February 26, 2018
The House amended its original proposed supplemental spending plan, HB 2299 to add $1.0 billion for school worker salaries and made other adjustments, bringing its version of the General Fund operating budget for 2017-19 to nearly $ 44.1 billion and $88.5 billion in total funds appropriated. The House budget relies on a capital gains income tax, which would require a vote on a separate bill, HB 2967. That bill has not yet been scheduled for a vote. ?The House did not pass HB 2299 on Friday, but replaced SB 6032 as passed by the Senate with a striking amendment that is identical to the House bill. The bill was returned to the Senate which will either concur with the House amendment or send the measure to conference committee to reconcile the two versions.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5992: Concerning bump-fire stocks. Passed the Senate on Final Passage on February 27, 2018 by a vote of 31-18. on February 27, 2018
The Senate concurred in the House amendments and the bill was delivered to the Governor.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6002: Enacting the Washington voting rights act of 2018. Passed the House on February 27, 2018 by a vote of 52-46. on February 27, 2018
The bill passed the Senate last January by a vote of 29-19 and was amended in the House. It would creates a state voting rights act to protect the equal opportunity for minority groups to participate in local elections and elect candidates of their choice. It would authorize courts to order appropriate remedies for a violation of the voting rights act, including redistricting within a political subdivision, and allows local governments to change their election systems to remedy potential violations of the act. The bill was returned to the Senate for concurrence action.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6199: Concerning the individual provider employment administrator program. Passed the House on March 1, 2018 by a vote of 50-0, 48 members not voting. on March 1, 2018
The bill, which passed the Senate earlier in February by a 26-21 vote, would shift the administration of home-health care workers from the Department of Social and Health Services to a private entity. Currently, these workers are not considered full state employees and thus, under a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision, are not required to pay dues or representation fees to a public employee union. Under this bill, the individual care providers, including those that provide care for family members, would be part of a private employer organization subject to mandatory union dues or fees. Republicans refused to vote on the bill in protest to rulings by the presiding officer of the House that prevented them from offering amendments or discussing the implications of forced payment of union dues or fees. The bill will be forwarded to the governor for final enactment into law.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5991: Increasing transparency of contributions by creating the Washington state DISCLOSE act of 2018. Passed the House on February 28, 2018 by a vote of 53-45. on February 28, 2018
Passed in January by a 32-17 in the Senate, this bill was amended in the House to require certain nonprofit organizations participating in political campaign financing to report to the Public Disclosure Commission on its top contributors and its expenditures to political campaigns or groups. It creates reporting requirements under campaign finance and disclosure laws are for "incidental committees," which are defined as any nonprofit organization, not otherwise reporting as a political committee that makes political contributions or expenditures in political campaigns. Each report must disclose the top 10 largest payments that exceed an aggregate of $10,000 in a calendar year, and any expenditure of $50 or more made to an election campaign, political committee, or other incidental committees. In committee testimony on the bill, concerns were expressed that there could be unintended consequences that will require reporting on non- political fundraising. The bill will be returned to the Senate for concurrence action.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5955: Concerning the collection of a motor vehicle excise tax by a regional transit authority. Passed the Senate on February 28, 2018 by a vote of 30-14, five members excused. on February 28, 2018
This is a “car tab relief” bill that would require a Regional Transit Authority (RTA), i.e. Sound Transit, to implement a motor vehicle excise tax calculation scale which more accurately reflects true car value. Under the bill, an RTA would also have to issue credit refunds to those who purchased tabs before September 1, 2018. The bill was referred to the House Transportation committee and is scheduled for a hearing and executive session on March 3rd.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 6199: Concerning the individual provider employment administrator program. Passed the Senate on February 10, 2018 by a vote of 26-21, two members excused. on February 10, 2018
Some 35,000 home health care workers currently contract with the state Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) to provide services to the elderly and developmentally disabled children, but they are not full-fledged public employees, because they can be hired or fired by the people who actually receive services from them. In 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court in its “Harris v. Quinn” decision ruled that home health care workers are not required to pay dues or fees to public sector unions, since they are not full state workers. This union-backed bill would make these workers private employees by outsourcing the state contracting functions to a private vendor. This private status would then allow unions to create a “closed shop” through which home-care workers would pay mandatory union dues or agency fees. The bill is now before the House Health Care and Wellness committee. A public hearing is scheduled for February 20th.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6079: Exempting public employee dates of birth from public disclosure requirements. Passed the Senate on February 10, 2018 by a vote of 25-22, two members excused. on February 10, 2018
This is another union-backed bill, which would make it more difficult to identify and contact specific state employees. Proponents say it is necessary to protect state workers from identity theft and other threats to their privacy. Opponents, including some in the media, say it is harder to hold public employees accountable, because birthdates are key to identifying specific individuals. The Freedom Foundation a Washington state think tank that has advocated reducing the power of public-sector unions, say the bill would also make it harder to notify public employees of their legal right not to pay union fees. The bill is now before the House State Government, Elections and Information Technology Committee. A public hearing is scheduled for February 20th.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2751: Concerning the deduction of union dues and fees. Passed the House on February 12, 2018 by a vote of 50-48. on February 12, 2018
Under current laws governing collective bargaining between certain public employees and employers, when an employee within a bargaining unit files a written authorization with the employer, the union has the right to have deducted from the employee's salary an amount equal to fees and dues required as a condition of acquiring or retaining union membership. The fees and dues must be deducted each pay period, and the employer must transmit the deductions to the union. This bill would remove the requirement that written authorization to deduct union dues and fees be filed by workers with employers. The bill is now before the Senate Labor and Commerce committee, and a public hearing is scheduled for February 19th.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6353: Concerning procedures in order to automatically register citizens to vote. Passed the Senate on February 10th by a vote of 34-13, two members excused. on February 10, 2018
This bill would provide for automatic voter registration of applicants for enhanced driver’s licenses or identicards. It would also eliminate the day and month of birth from Washington’s public voter rolls, but an amendment to the bill would still allow disclosure of a voter’s birth year. The bill was referred to the House State Government, Elections and Information Technology committee
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2595: Concerning procedures in order to automatically register citizens to vote. Passed the House on February 12, 2018 by a vote of 50-48. on February 12, 2018
This is the companion measure to the Senate’s voter registration bill with essentially the same provisions. It is currently before the Senate Committee on State Government, Tribal Relations and Elections
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1513: Concerning the collection of youth voter registration sign up information. Passed the House on February 12, 2018 by a vote of 52-46. on February 12, 2018
This bill would permit voter pre-registration of 16- and 17- year old citizens, automatically qualifying them to vote in the first election following their 18th birthday. It would require social studies teachers and county auditors to coordinate voter registration events on Temperance and Good Citizenship Day in history or social studies classes for high school seniors. Bills to allow pre-registration for teenagers have passed the House five times in the last five years, including this bill during the 2017 session, but they were not considered in the Republican led Senate. With Democrats now controlling that chamber, leaders say a vote in the Senate is likely this session. The bill was referred to the Senate State Government, Tribal Relations and Elections committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6052: Eliminating the death penalty and instead requiring life imprisonment without possibility of release or parole as the sentence for aggravated first degree murder. Passed the Senate on February 14, 2018 by a vote of 26-22, one member excused. on February 14, 2018
This bill would end capital punishment in Washington state, providing instead that all persons convicted of Aggravated First Degree Murder must be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of release or parole. Opponents of the bill tried unsuccessfully to add exceptions for the first-degree murder of a police officer, or a corrections officer, and the bill was debated passionately before it passed on a close, but mixed partisan vote. Five Republicans voted with the majority, and four Democrats voted “No.” The bill was referred to the House Judiciary committee.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6084: Requiring maintenance of minimum essential health care coverage. Passed the Senate on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 25-3, one member excused. on February 7, 2018
The federal Affordable Care Act imposes an individual mandate for health insurance coverage that is enforced by an income tax penalty on uncovered persons. Beginning in January 2019, the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that was signed into law by President Trump last December effectively eliminated the individual mandate by reducing all penalties for failing to maintain minimum essential health care coverage to zero. This bill would impose a state individual mandate for health insurance coverage by requiring that all residents of the state must ensure that they and any dependents are covered under minimum essential health care coverage for each month. Since Washington does not have a state income tax, the bill directs the state Office of the Insurance Commissioner to convene a task force to explore individual mandate enforcement mechanisms and report to the Legislature by December 1, 2018.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1541: Providing for prescription drug cost transparency. Passed the House on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 50-48. on February 7, 2018
This bill would require the Office of Financial Management to use a competitive procurement process to select a data organization to collect, verify, and summarize prescription drug pricing data provided by issuers and drug manufacturers. "Prescription drugs" include generic, brand name, and specialty drugs, as well as biological products. The data organization would have to provide an annual report that identifies overall spending on prescription drugs; identifies the 25 most frequently prescribed and costliest prescription drugs, and provides summary data that demonstrates the impact of prescription drug costs, as compared to other health care costs, on health insurance premiums.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6037: Concerning the uniform parentage act. Passed the Senate on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 27-21, one member excused. on February 7, 2018
Washington’s Uniform Parentage Act (UPA) provides for how a legal parent child relationship may be established or challenged, and how a determination of parentage may be used by courts in other proceedings including child support. It also regulates surrogacy and provides that surrogacy parenting agreements may not include compensation. This bill would revise a number of provisions in the UPA, key among which are changes to surrogacy agreements. It would allow a surrogacy agreement to provide for payment of consideration and reasonable expenses and may include reimbursement for specific expenses if the agreement is terminated. A woman acting as a surrogate would have to be 21 years of age, have previously given birth to one child, and have independent legal representation throughout the surrogacy arrangement. Surrogacy agreements would have to include information disclosing how intended parents will cover expenses of the surrogate and child including health care provisions and must permit the surrogate to make all health and welfare decisions regarding the surrogate's pregnancy. The right of a woman to terminate her pregnancy would not be diminished by this act.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1298: Prohibiting employers from asking about arrests or convictions before an applicant is determined otherwise qualified for a position. Passed the House on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 52-46. on February 7, 2018
This bill would prohibit an employer from including any question on an application or inquiring into an applicant's criminal background until after the employer initially determines that the applicant is otherwise qualified for the position. It would also prohibit advertising job openings in a way that excludes people with criminal records and any policy or practice that automatically or categorically excludes individuals with a criminal record from consideration Prohibited practices would also include rejecting an applicant for failure to disclose a criminal record prior to initially determining the applicant is otherwise qualified.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5288: Authorizing certain public transportation benefit areas to impose a sales and use tax increase approved by voters. Passed the Senate on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 34-14, one member excused. on February 7, 2018
A Public Transportation Benefit Area (PTBA) is a special-purpose district authorized to provide public transportation service within all or a portion of a county or counties. The PTBA is the most common type of district providing public transportation service in the state, with 21 currently in existence. A PTBA may collect fares for service and, with approval of the majority of the voters within the area, impose a sales and use tax within the area. Currently all but one PTBA may impose a sales and use tax up to a 0.9 percent. One PTBA operating in Snohomish County meets the population threshold required to implement an additional 0.3 percent, for a total of 1.2 percent voter approved sales and use tax. The bill would revise the requirements to for allowing an additional 0.3 percent sales and use tax with voter approval. Currently, the PTBA operating in Thurston County would meet the new requirement of being a PTBA in a county with a population of more than 250,000, but less than 400,000, and also containing two or more cities with a population of over 40,000.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6086: Protecting the state's marine waters from the release of nonnative finfish from marine finfish aquaculture sites. Passed the Senate on February 8, 2018 by a vote of 35-12, two members excused. on February 8, 2018
This bill would phase out Atlantic salmon net-pen farming by prohibiting the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) from entering into a new lease or other aquatic lands use authorization that involves marine finfish aquaculture of Atlantic salmon. Additionally, DNR would not be allowed to renew or extend an existing lease or use authorization that involves those same activities.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6219: Concerning health plan coverage of reproductive health care. Passed the Senate on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 26-22, one member excused. on January 31, 2018
This measure would require health insurance plans in Washington that offer maternity care coverage to also cover elective abortions. It would also mandate coverage for all contraceptive drugs, devices, products and services, as well as voluntary sterilization with no co-payments or deductibles. Amendments to exclude elective abortion for gender selection and granting exemptions for employers opposed to abortion on conscience or religious grounds were rejected. The bill is now before the House Health Care and Wellness Committee.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1523: Requiring health plans to cover, with no cost sharing, the same preventive services required by federal law as of December 2016. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 56-38, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
Under this bill, a health insurance plan in Washington must, at a minimum, provide coverage for the same preventive services required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and any federal rules or guidance in effect on December 31, 2016. These include contraception for women, immunizations for certain diseases, autism screening for children blood pressure and cholesterol screenings; and screenings for certain diseases, including diabetes, colorectal cancer, and HIV. A health plan may not impose cost-sharing requirements for these preventive services. The bill is now before the Senate Health and Long Term Care Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1188: Concerning the use of child passenger restraint systems. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 64-30, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
The bill requires a child to be properly secured in a rear-facing child restraint system until the age of 2 or until it reaches the seat manufacturer-set weight and height limits. A child not secured in a rear-facing seat who is under the age of 4 must be properly secured in a forward-facing child restraint system until he or she reaches the seat manufacturer-set weight or height limits. Children under the age of 10 or under 4 feet 9 inches must be properly secured in a child booster seat until they reach the seat-manufacturer-set weight or height limits. The bill also mandates that the Washington Traffic Safety Commission produce and distribute informational and educational material on child restraint systems. The bill is now before the Senate Transportation Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1169: Enacting the student opportunity, assistance, and relief act. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 79-15, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
The bill would repeal multiple provisions in current law that allow suspension of a professional license due to student loan default. It changes the judgment interest rate for unpaid private student loan debt to 2 percentage points above the prime rate, unless the judgment interest rate is specified in the contract and increases the bank account and wage garnishment exemptions for judgments on private student loan debt. Garnishment and continuing liens on earnings would have to specify whether they are for private student loan debt, and if so, to notify the debtor of their exemption rights for private student loan debt. The bill is now before the Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1060: Concerning the administration of marijuana to students for medical purposes. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 67-27, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
This bill would require school districts to allow students to consume marijuana for medical purposes on school grounds, aboard a school bus, or while attending a school- sponsored event. It directs school districts to establish policies related to the consumption of marijuana by students for medical purposes if requested by the parent or guardian of a student who is a qualifying patient. The bill is now before the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2384: Concerning consumer reporting agency security freeze fees. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 81-13, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
This bill would prohibit a consumer reporting agency from imposing a charge on a consumer for a request to place, temporarily lift, or remove a security freeze. The bill is now before the Senate Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2311: Reducing barriers to student participation in extracurricular activities. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 62-32, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
This bill would limit the maximum fee charged to a public or private high school student who is eligible for federal free and reduced-price meals program, to five dollars for an associated student body card, other student identification card, participating in an extracurricular activity, or participating in career and technical student organizations. It would also prohibit a student from being required to complete a physical examination to participate in extracurricular activities more often than every twenty-four months. The bill is now before the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2419: Regarding beer, wine, cider, and mead at farmers markets. Passed the House on January29, 2018 by a vote of 78-17, three members excused. on January 29, 2018
The bill would authorize microbreweries to sell growlers and cans of beer to the public and domestic wineries to sell cider and mead of its own production by the bottle or in a growler at farmers markets. It also allows domestic wineries to provide tasting samples of cider and mead to the public at farmers markets. The bill is now before the Senate Labor and Commerce Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Showing 40 Results        Show Entire Session

Contact my lawmakers
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7886. gerry.pollet@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786 - 7818 . javier.valdez@leg.wa.gov
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7690. david.frockt@leg.wa.gov



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