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My Legislators' Key Votes

How my representative and senator voted on important or interesting measures
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Sen. David Frockt (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7690. david.frockt@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7886. gerry.pollet@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786 - 7818 . javier.valdez@leg.wa.gov
 

Senate Bill 6199: Concerning the individual provider employment administrator program. Passed the Senate on February 10, 2018 by a vote of 26-21, two members excused. on February 10, 2018
Some 35,000 home health care workers currently contract with the state Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) to provide services to the elderly and developmentally disabled children, but they are not full-fledged public employees, because they can be hired or fired by the people who actually receive services from them. In 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court in its “Harris v. Quinn” decision ruled that home health care workers are not required to pay dues or fees to public sector unions, since they are not full state workers. This union-backed bill would make these workers private employees by outsourcing the state contracting functions to a private vendor. This private status would then allow unions to create a “closed shop” through which home-care workers would pay mandatory union dues or agency fees. The bill is now before the House Health Care and Wellness committee. A public hearing is scheduled for February 20th.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6079: Exempting public employee dates of birth from public disclosure requirements. Passed the Senate on February 10, 2018 by a vote of 25-22, two members excused. on February 10, 2018
This is another union-backed bill, which would make it more difficult to identify and contact specific state employees. Proponents say it is necessary to protect state workers from identity theft and other threats to their privacy. Opponents, including some in the media, say it is harder to hold public employees accountable, because birthdates are key to identifying specific individuals. The Freedom Foundation a Washington state think tank that has advocated reducing the power of public-sector unions, say the bill would also make it harder to notify public employees of their legal right not to pay union fees. The bill is now before the House State Government, Elections and Information Technology Committee. A public hearing is scheduled for February 20th.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2751: Concerning the deduction of union dues and fees. Passed the House on February 12, 2018 by a vote of 50-48. on February 12, 2018
Under current laws governing collective bargaining between certain public employees and employers, when an employee within a bargaining unit files a written authorization with the employer, the union has the right to have deducted from the employee's salary an amount equal to fees and dues required as a condition of acquiring or retaining union membership. The fees and dues must be deducted each pay period, and the employer must transmit the deductions to the union. This bill would remove the requirement that written authorization to deduct union dues and fees be filed by workers with employers. The bill is now before the Senate Labor and Commerce committee, and a public hearing is scheduled for February 19th.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6353: Concerning procedures in order to automatically register citizens to vote. Passed the Senate on February 10th by a vote of 34-13, two members excused. on February 10, 2018
This bill would provide for automatic voter registration of applicants for enhanced driver’s licenses or identicards. It would also eliminate the day and month of birth from Washington’s public voter rolls, but an amendment to the bill would still allow disclosure of a voter’s birth year. The bill was referred to the House State Government, Elections and Information Technology committee
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2595: Concerning procedures in order to automatically register citizens to vote. Passed the House on February 12, 2018 by a vote of 50-48. on February 12, 2018
This is the companion measure to the Senate’s voter registration bill with essentially the same provisions. It is currently before the Senate Committee on State Government, Tribal Relations and Elections
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1513: Concerning the collection of youth voter registration sign up information. Passed the House on February 12, 2018 by a vote of 52-46. on February 12, 2018
This bill would permit voter pre-registration of 16- and 17- year old citizens, automatically qualifying them to vote in the first election following their 18th birthday. It would require social studies teachers and county auditors to coordinate voter registration events on Temperance and Good Citizenship Day in history or social studies classes for high school seniors. Bills to allow pre-registration for teenagers have passed the House five times in the last five years, including this bill during the 2017 session, but they were not considered in the Republican led Senate. With Democrats now controlling that chamber, leaders say a vote in the Senate is likely this session. The bill was referred to the Senate State Government, Tribal Relations and Elections committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6052: Eliminating the death penalty and instead requiring life imprisonment without possibility of release or parole as the sentence for aggravated first degree murder. Passed the Senate on February 14, 2018 by a vote of 26-22, one member excused. on February 14, 2018
This bill would end capital punishment in Washington state, providing instead that all persons convicted of Aggravated First Degree Murder must be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of release or parole. Opponents of the bill tried unsuccessfully to add exceptions for the first-degree murder of a police officer, or a corrections officer, and the bill was debated passionately before it passed on a close, but mixed partisan vote. Five Republicans voted with the majority, and four Democrats voted “No.” The bill was referred to the House Judiciary committee.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6084: Requiring maintenance of minimum essential health care coverage. Passed the Senate on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 25-3, one member excused. on February 7, 2018
The federal Affordable Care Act imposes an individual mandate for health insurance coverage that is enforced by an income tax penalty on uncovered persons. Beginning in January 2019, the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that was signed into law by President Trump last December effectively eliminated the individual mandate by reducing all penalties for failing to maintain minimum essential health care coverage to zero. This bill would impose a state individual mandate for health insurance coverage by requiring that all residents of the state must ensure that they and any dependents are covered under minimum essential health care coverage for each month. Since Washington does not have a state income tax, the bill directs the state Office of the Insurance Commissioner to convene a task force to explore individual mandate enforcement mechanisms and report to the Legislature by December 1, 2018.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1541: Providing for prescription drug cost transparency. Passed the House on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 50-48. on February 7, 2018
This bill would require the Office of Financial Management to use a competitive procurement process to select a data organization to collect, verify, and summarize prescription drug pricing data provided by issuers and drug manufacturers. "Prescription drugs" include generic, brand name, and specialty drugs, as well as biological products. The data organization would have to provide an annual report that identifies overall spending on prescription drugs; identifies the 25 most frequently prescribed and costliest prescription drugs, and provides summary data that demonstrates the impact of prescription drug costs, as compared to other health care costs, on health insurance premiums.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6037: Concerning the uniform parentage act. Passed the Senate on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 27-21, one member excused. on February 7, 2018
Washington’s Uniform Parentage Act (UPA) provides for how a legal parent child relationship may be established or challenged, and how a determination of parentage may be used by courts in other proceedings including child support. It also regulates surrogacy and provides that surrogacy parenting agreements may not include compensation. This bill would revise a number of provisions in the UPA, key among which are changes to surrogacy agreements. It would allow a surrogacy agreement to provide for payment of consideration and reasonable expenses and may include reimbursement for specific expenses if the agreement is terminated. A woman acting as a surrogate would have to be 21 years of age, have previously given birth to one child, and have independent legal representation throughout the surrogacy arrangement. Surrogacy agreements would have to include information disclosing how intended parents will cover expenses of the surrogate and child including health care provisions and must permit the surrogate to make all health and welfare decisions regarding the surrogate's pregnancy. The right of a woman to terminate her pregnancy would not be diminished by this act.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1298: Prohibiting employers from asking about arrests or convictions before an applicant is determined otherwise qualified for a position. Passed the House on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 52-46. on February 7, 2018
This bill would prohibit an employer from including any question on an application or inquiring into an applicant's criminal background until after the employer initially determines that the applicant is otherwise qualified for the position. It would also prohibit advertising job openings in a way that excludes people with criminal records and any policy or practice that automatically or categorically excludes individuals with a criminal record from consideration Prohibited practices would also include rejecting an applicant for failure to disclose a criminal record prior to initially determining the applicant is otherwise qualified.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5288: Authorizing certain public transportation benefit areas to impose a sales and use tax increase approved by voters. Passed the Senate on February 7, 2018 by a vote of 34-14, one member excused. on February 7, 2018
A Public Transportation Benefit Area (PTBA) is a special-purpose district authorized to provide public transportation service within all or a portion of a county or counties. The PTBA is the most common type of district providing public transportation service in the state, with 21 currently in existence. A PTBA may collect fares for service and, with approval of the majority of the voters within the area, impose a sales and use tax within the area. Currently all but one PTBA may impose a sales and use tax up to a 0.9 percent. One PTBA operating in Snohomish County meets the population threshold required to implement an additional 0.3 percent, for a total of 1.2 percent voter approved sales and use tax. The bill would revise the requirements to for allowing an additional 0.3 percent sales and use tax with voter approval. Currently, the PTBA operating in Thurston County would meet the new requirement of being a PTBA in a county with a population of more than 250,000, but less than 400,000, and also containing two or more cities with a population of over 40,000.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6086: Protecting the state's marine waters from the release of nonnative finfish from marine finfish aquaculture sites. Passed the Senate on February 8, 2018 by a vote of 35-12, two members excused. on February 8, 2018
This bill would phase out Atlantic salmon net-pen farming by prohibiting the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) from entering into a new lease or other aquatic lands use authorization that involves marine finfish aquaculture of Atlantic salmon. Additionally, DNR would not be allowed to renew or extend an existing lease or use authorization that involves those same activities.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6219: Concerning health plan coverage of reproductive health care. Passed the Senate on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 26-22, one member excused. on January 31, 2018
This measure would require health insurance plans in Washington that offer maternity care coverage to also cover elective abortions. It would also mandate coverage for all contraceptive drugs, devices, products and services, as well as voluntary sterilization with no co-payments or deductibles. Amendments to exclude elective abortion for gender selection and granting exemptions for employers opposed to abortion on conscience or religious grounds were rejected. The bill is now before the House Health Care and Wellness Committee.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1523: Requiring health plans to cover, with no cost sharing, the same preventive services required by federal law as of December 2016. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 56-38, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
Under this bill, a health insurance plan in Washington must, at a minimum, provide coverage for the same preventive services required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and any federal rules or guidance in effect on December 31, 2016. These include contraception for women, immunizations for certain diseases, autism screening for children blood pressure and cholesterol screenings; and screenings for certain diseases, including diabetes, colorectal cancer, and HIV. A health plan may not impose cost-sharing requirements for these preventive services. The bill is now before the Senate Health and Long Term Care Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1188: Concerning the use of child passenger restraint systems. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 64-30, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
The bill requires a child to be properly secured in a rear-facing child restraint system until the age of 2 or until it reaches the seat manufacturer-set weight and height limits. A child not secured in a rear-facing seat who is under the age of 4 must be properly secured in a forward-facing child restraint system until he or she reaches the seat manufacturer-set weight or height limits. Children under the age of 10 or under 4 feet 9 inches must be properly secured in a child booster seat until they reach the seat-manufacturer-set weight or height limits. The bill also mandates that the Washington Traffic Safety Commission produce and distribute informational and educational material on child restraint systems. The bill is now before the Senate Transportation Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1169: Enacting the student opportunity, assistance, and relief act. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 79-15, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
The bill would repeal multiple provisions in current law that allow suspension of a professional license due to student loan default. It changes the judgment interest rate for unpaid private student loan debt to 2 percentage points above the prime rate, unless the judgment interest rate is specified in the contract and increases the bank account and wage garnishment exemptions for judgments on private student loan debt. Garnishment and continuing liens on earnings would have to specify whether they are for private student loan debt, and if so, to notify the debtor of their exemption rights for private student loan debt. The bill is now before the Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1060: Concerning the administration of marijuana to students for medical purposes. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 67-27, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
This bill would require school districts to allow students to consume marijuana for medical purposes on school grounds, aboard a school bus, or while attending a school- sponsored event. It directs school districts to establish policies related to the consumption of marijuana by students for medical purposes if requested by the parent or guardian of a student who is a qualifying patient. The bill is now before the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2384: Concerning consumer reporting agency security freeze fees. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 81-13, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
This bill would prohibit a consumer reporting agency from imposing a charge on a consumer for a request to place, temporarily lift, or remove a security freeze. The bill is now before the Senate Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2311: Reducing barriers to student participation in extracurricular activities. Passed the House on January 31, 2018 by a vote of 62-32, four members excused. on January 31, 2018
This bill would limit the maximum fee charged to a public or private high school student who is eligible for federal free and reduced-price meals program, to five dollars for an associated student body card, other student identification card, participating in an extracurricular activity, or participating in career and technical student organizations. It would also prohibit a student from being required to complete a physical examination to participate in extracurricular activities more often than every twenty-four months. The bill is now before the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2419: Regarding beer, wine, cider, and mead at farmers markets. Passed the House on January29, 2018 by a vote of 78-17, three members excused. on January 29, 2018
The bill would authorize microbreweries to sell growlers and cans of beer to the public and domestic wineries to sell cider and mead of its own production by the bottle or in a growler at farmers markets. It also allows domestic wineries to provide tasting samples of cider and mead to the public at farmers markets. The bill is now before the Senate Labor and Commerce Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1723: Creating the presumption of occupational disease for certain employees at the Hanford facility. Passed the Senate on January 25, 2018 by a vote of 35-14. on January 25, 2018
The bill would establish a presumption with regard to United States Department of Energy Hanford site workers who are covered under the state industrial insurance act that the following are occupational diseases: Respiratory disease; heart problems, experienced within seventy-two hours of exposure to fumes, toxic substances, or chemicals at the site; cancer; acute and chronic beryillium disease; and neurological disease. The bill passed the House earlier this session by a vote of 76-22. The bill will go back to the House to accept or reject Senate amendments before final passage.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5722: Restricting the practice of conversion therapy. Passed the Senate on January 19, 2018 by a vote of 32-16, one member excused. on January 19, 2018
This bill would make it “unprofessional conduct” for a licensed health-care provider to perform conversion therapy on patients younger than 18. Conversion therapy means a regime that seeks to change an individual's sexual orientation or gender identity, including efforts to change behaviors or gender expressions, or to eliminate or reduce sexual or romantic attractions or feelings toward individuals of the same sex. Under the bill, clergy members, volunteer counselors, or parents would not be restricted from attempting the practice, but child-abuse statutes might come into play. The bill is now before the House Health Care and Wellness Committee for consideration.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5766: Preventing harassment, intimidation, and bullying in public schools. Passed the Senate on January 19, 2018 by a vote of 30-18, one member excused. on January 19, 2018
Under this bill school districts must, by August 1, 2018, adopt or amend, if necessary, a transgender student policy and procedure. The policy must include provisions addressing discriminatory harassment of transgender students and must incorporate: the transgender student policy and procedure created by Washington State School Directors Association; and the rules and guidelines developed by the Superintendent of Public Instruction to eliminate discrimination in public schools on the basis of gender identity and expression. School districts must share this policy with parents or guardians, students, volunteers, and school employees and develop a training class for staff in charge of transgender and anti-harassment, intimidation, or bullying policies. The bill is now before the House Education Committee for consideration.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6002: Enacting the Washington voting rights act of 2018. Passed the Senate on January 19, 2018 by a vote of 29-19, one member excused. on January 19, 2018
The bill would create a voting rights act to protect the equal opportunity for minority groups to participate in local elections. It would create a cause of action and authorize courts to order appropriate remedies for a violation of the act, including redistricting within a political subdivision. It would also authorize local governments to change their election system to remedy violations of the act The act would apply to elections held within certain political subdivisions including: counties; cities; towns; school districts; fire protection districts; port districts; and public utility districts. It would not apply to state elections, elections in a city or town with a population under 1,000 people, or school districts with under 250 students. The bill was referred to the House Committee on State Government, Elections and Information Technology.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6021: Extending the period for voter registration. Passed the Senate on January 17, 2018 by a vote of 29-20. on January 17, 2018
In addition to authorizing voter registration by mail or electronically up to eight days before an election, this bill would allow in-person voter registration and voter registration updates up to 8:00 p.m. the day of the election, i.e. same-day voter registration. Current law provides that to register to vote, a person must submit an application via mail or an online registration no later than 29 days before the day of the next primary, special, or general election, or in person at their county auditor's office no later than eight days before the election. A person may update voter registration at least 29 days before an election for the change to be effective for that election. The bill was referred to the House Committee on State Government, Elections and Information Technology.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5074: Aligning eligibility for the college bound scholarship program with the state need grant program. Passed the Senate on January 24, 2018 by a vote of 38-11. on January 24, 2018
This bill would make students in this state who came to this country illegally as children eligible for state financial aid to pay for college. Currently, students without legal immigration status are not eligible for federal financial aid. Under the bill, students who have been here for at least three years before earning a high school diploma would qualify for the College Bound scholarship program available to low-income Washington students. It would include those with Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) status and also establishes that the term nonresident student does not pertain to certain visa holders that meet other statutory requirements regarding residency. The bill is now before the House Education Committee for consideration.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2201: Concerning the collection of a motor vehicle excise tax approved by voters of a regional transit authority in 2016. Passed the House on January 24, 2018 by a vote of 60-37, one member excused. on January 24, 2018
This bill was passed by the House last year, but did not receive further action in the Senate before the legislature adjourned. It seeks to ease the impact of car tab fees imposed by Sound Transit, under the authority that was adopted by Sound Transit voters in King, Piere, and Snohomish Counties in 2016. The issue revolves around the valuation of cars, which in most instances has exceeded the actual market value of cars. The bill provides that Sound Transit must establish a market value adjustment program that reflects more realistic vehicle values, such as Kelly Blue Book, and provide a credit against tax due equal to the tax under current law, less the tax otherwise due, were the tax to be calculated using the 2006 valuation schedule, but only if the resulting difference is positive. The credit applies only to the 0.8 percent Motor Vehicle Excise Tax (MVET) authorized by the 2015 Legislature. The program must allow credits retroactively to the date that that Sond Transit first imposed the 0.8 percent MVET. The bill was referred to the Senate Transportation Committee.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5992: Concerning bump-fire stocks. Passed the Senate on January 25, 2018 by a vote of 29-20. on January 25, 2018
The Senate passed this bill on Thursday evening to ban trigger modification devices that allow legal semi-automatic firearms to simulate automatic weapons fire. Automatic weapons, or machine guns, are tightly restricted or outlawed under current federal and state laws. The ban would make it illegal for anyone in Washington to manufacture or sell bump stocks beginning July 1, 2018. In July 2019, it would become illegal to own or possess a bump stock in Washington, which means current owners of such devices would have to turn them in to law enforcement or destroy them. The action was prompted by last October’s shooting in Las Vegas in which bump stocks were used for rapid fire that killed 58 persons and left hundreds more injured.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6091: Ensuring that water is available to support development. Passed the Senate on January 18, 2018 by a vote of 35-14. on January 18, 2018
As passed, this is the compromise bill that provides a fix to the so-called Hirst decision, the 2016 state Supreme Court ruling which restricted new household wells in rural areas that might affect stream flows and impact water temperatures for fish. The 6-3 ruling by the court required counties to make their own, independent studies of water availability before issuing building permits. A number of counties could not make such assessments, and consequently stopped issuing new building permits. That left property owners unable to build homes or develop their land. Under the bill, landowners in rural areas will now be able to drill household wells while planners in local Water Resource Inventory Areas (WRIA) create new long-term water usage plans. The plans must include measures to offset potential impacts to rivers from such wells. As they were able to do before the court decision, local governments can rely on the state Department of Ecology’s water rules for determining impacts on water availability. The bill limits water withdrawals from new wells to between 950 and 3,000 gallons a day, depending on the area, and requires landowners to pay a $500 fee to access a domestic well. It also appropriates $300 million over the next 15 years for projects to improve stream flows and restore watersheds.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6091: Ensuring that water is available to support development. Passed the House on January 18, 2018 by a vote of 66-30, two members excused. on January 18, 2018
After passage in the Senate on Thursday night, the bill was immediately transmitted to the House for action, and the bill is on the way to the Governor’s desk for his signature.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted No'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 6090: 2017-19 Capital Budget. Passed the Senate on January 18, 2018 by a vote of 49-0. on January 18, 2018
The Capital Budget generally includes appropriations for the acquisition, construction, and repair of capital assets such as land, buildings, and other infrastructure improvements. Funding for the Capital Budget is primarily from state general obligation bonds, with other funding derived from various dedicated taxes, fees, and state trust land revenues. This bill authorizes $4.2 billion for new capital projects for state agencies and institutions of higher education for the 2017-19 fiscal biennium. Of this, $2.77 is financed with state general obligation bonds. The budget also authorizes state agencies and institutions of higher education to enter into alternative financing contracts for a total of $174 million.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 6090: 2017-19 Capital Budget. Passed the House on January 18, 2018 by a vote of 95-1, two members excused. on January 18, 2018
The House passed the bill immediately after it passed the Senate, and it is on the way to the Governor’s desk for his signature.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1080: Concerning state general obligation bonds and related accounts. Passed the House on January 18, 2018 by a vote of 94-2, two members excused. on January 18, 2018
General obligation bonds pledge the full faith, credit, and taxing power of the state toward payment of debt service. Funding to pay for principal and interest on those bonds is appropriated from the state General Fund in the operating budget. A bond bill authorizes the issuance of general obligation bonds up to a specific amount to finance many of the projects in the Capital Budget. Legislation authorizing the issuance of bonds requires a 60 percent majority vote in both the House and the Senate. This bill authorizes the State Finance Committee to issue up to $2.9 billion in general obligation bonds to finance projects in the 2017-19 Capital Budget, and to pay issuance and bond sale expenses. It also authorizes the Committee to issue up to $300 million in general obligation bonds over fifteen years, beginning in the 2017-19 biennium, to finance watershed restoration and enhancement projects.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1080: Concerning state general obligation bonds and related accounts. Passed the Senate on January 18, 2018 by a vote of 47-2. on January 18, 2018
After House passage, the Senate passed the bill, and it is on the way to the Governor’s desk for his signature.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1506: Regulating workplace practices to achieve gender pay equity. Passed the House on January 17, 2018 by a vote of 69-28, one member excused. on January 17, 2018
Under the state's current Equal Pay Act (EPA), an employer who discriminates in the payment of wages as between sexes or who pays any female a lesser wage than males similarly employed is guilty of a misdemeanor. The EPA further provides that if a female receives less compensation because of sex discrimination, she may sue and recover the difference in compensation she should have received. This bill modifies the state Equal Pay Act by defining "similarly employed," as the performance of a job that requires similar skill, effort, and responsibility, and the job is under similar working conditions. Job titles are not the determining factor in this definition. It prohibits discrimination in providing career advancement opportunities based on gender, and prohibits retaliation for workplace discussions, such as comparing wages or encouraging others to exercise their rights. Violation of the act would result in actual damages $5,000, whichever is greater; and interest, and a fine of up to $1,000. The bill passed the House but was not acted on in the Senate during the 2017 session. It is now before the Senate Labor and Commerce Committee for further consideration.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2242: Fully funding state basic education by providing equitable education opportunities through reform of state and local education contributions. Passed the House on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 67-26 (Five members excused). on June 30, 2017
This bill seeks to meet the final piece of the state Supreme Court’s 2012 “McCleary” mandate. Lawmakers had already provided more than $2 billion in additional school funding in previous sessions, but the largest problem remaining centered on state funding for teacher salaries. School districts currently pay for a large part of those salaries with local property tax levies. A key element of the bill, as passed, is to raise the statewide property tax from $1.89 to $2.70 per $1,000 of assessed value, starting next year, with the increase going to education funding. The plan then caps local property tax levies, at a lower level beginning in 2019 and limits what the money can be spent on. The school district levy lid is capped at the lesser of $2,500 per student or $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value, effective calendar year 2019 and limits use of school district levies and local effort assistance to enrichment as defined. Local effort assistance is provided in proportion to a school district's actual levy compared to the maximum levy, up to a combined total of $1,500 per student, effective calendar year 2019. Overall, the bill adds some $7.3 billion in state funding for basic education over the next four
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2242: Fully funding state basic education by providing equitable education opportunities through reform of state and local education contributions. Passed the Senate on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 32-17. on June 30, 2017
Partially veto on July 6, 2017. Governor Inslee vetoed sections of the bill that limited school districts’ use of late start and early release days to seven occurrences each school year; required the Caseload Forecast Council to convene a technical working group to determine the feasibility of developing a model to aid in school district four-year budget plans; and repealed statutes that govern approved training and continuing education clock hours for credit on the salary schedule, effective for the 2017-18 school year.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5883: Making operating appropriations for the 2015-2017 (Supplemental) and 2017-2019 fiscal biennia. Passed the Senate on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 39-10. on June 30, 2017
This bill is a $43.7 billion two-year spending plan for the various agencies and programs of the state for 2017-19, including appropriations for general government agencies, human services programs, natural resources agencies, and education institutions. In addition, it makes supplemental operating appropriations for 2015-2017 fiscal biennium. Budget summary materials are available online at www.fiscal.wa.gov under the Budget Bills & Documents header (Operating Budget).
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5883: Making operating appropriations for the 2015-2017 (Supplemental) and 2017-2019 fiscal biennia. Passed the House on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 70-23 (Five members excused). on June 30, 2017
Partial veto on June 30, 2017. Governor Inslee vetoed thirteen sections or subsections of the bill— dealing with studies on market rate and subsidized housing; occupational disease; burrowing shrimp control; local government legal obligations and revenue capacity; contract for Sound Transit sales tax collection; Washington Business One-Stop Portal; Legislative-Executive WorkFirst Poverty Reduction Oversight Task Force; prescription drug benefit administration; sub-minimum wage rulemaking; Center for Workers-King County; management reductions at transportation agencies; Law Enforcement Officers' and Fire Fighters' retirement system; and appropriations for the Health Care Authority.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Contact my lawmakers
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7690. david.frockt@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7886. gerry.pollet@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786 - 7818 . javier.valdez@leg.wa.gov



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