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My Legislators' Key Votes

How my state representative and state senator voted on important or interesting measures

My ZIP Code     My Street Name  such as "Broadway"

Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish), District 39. (360)-786-7967. kristiansen.dan@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington), District 47. (360) 786-7858. sullivan.pat@leg.wa.gov
Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island), District 34. (360) 786-7667. nelson.sharon@leg.wa.gov
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville), District 9. (360) 786-7620. schoesler.mark@leg.wa.gov
 

House Bill 2242: Fully funding state basic education by providing equitable education opportunities through reform of state and local education contributions. Passed the House on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 67-26 (Five members excused). on June 30, 2017
This bill seeks to meet the final piece of the state Supreme Court’s 2012 “McCleary” mandate. Lawmakers had already provided more than $2 billion in additional school funding in previous sessions, but the largest problem remaining centered on state funding for teacher salaries. School districts currently pay for a large part of those salaries with local property tax levies. A key element of the bill, as passed, is to raise the statewide property tax from $1.89 to $2.70 per $1,000 of assessed value, starting next year, with the increase going to education funding. The plan then caps local property tax levies, at a lower level beginning in 2019 and limits what the money can be spent on. The school district levy lid is capped at the lesser of $2,500 per student or $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value, effective calendar year 2019 and limits use of school district levies and local effort assistance to enrichment as defined. Local effort assistance is provided in proportion to a school district's actual levy compared to the maximum levy, up to a combined total of $1,500 per student, effective calendar year 2019. Overall, the bill adds some $7.3 billion in state funding for basic education over the next four
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2242: Fully funding state basic education by providing equitable education opportunities through reform of state and local education contributions. Passed the Senate on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 32-17. on June 30, 2017
Partially veto on July 6, 2017. Governor Inslee vetoed sections of the bill that limited school districts’ use of late start and early release days to seven occurrences each school year; required the Caseload Forecast Council to convene a technical working group to determine the feasibility of developing a model to aid in school district four-year budget plans; and repealed statutes that govern approved training and continuing education clock hours for credit on the salary schedule, effective for the 2017-18 school year.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5883: Making operating appropriations for the 2015-2017 (Supplemental) and 2017-2019 fiscal biennia. Passed the Senate on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 39-10. on June 30, 2017
This bill is a $43.7 billion two-year spending plan for the various agencies and programs of the state for 2017-19, including appropriations for general government agencies, human services programs, natural resources agencies, and education institutions. In addition, it makes supplemental operating appropriations for 2015-2017 fiscal biennium. Budget summary materials are available online at www.fiscal.wa.gov under the Budget Bills & Documents header (Operating Budget).
Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5883: Making operating appropriations for the 2015-2017 (Supplemental) and 2017-2019 fiscal biennia. Passed the House on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 70-23 (Five members excused). on June 30, 2017
Partial veto on June 30, 2017. Governor Inslee vetoed thirteen sections or subsections of the bill— dealing with studies on market rate and subsidized housing; occupational disease; burrowing shrimp control; local government legal obligations and revenue capacity; contract for Sound Transit sales tax collection; Washington Business One-Stop Portal; Legislative-Executive WorkFirst Poverty Reduction Oversight Task Force; prescription drug benefit administration; sub-minimum wage rulemaking; Center for Workers-King County; management reductions at transportation agencies; Law Enforcement Officers' and Fire Fighters' retirement system; and appropriations for the Health Care Authority.
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2163: Relating to Revenue. Passed the House on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 53-40 (Five members excused). on June 30, 2017
This bill imposes several new taxes by repealing current tax exemptions, including the retail sales tax on bottled water, and the tax on self-produced fuels. It also imposes new taxes on internet sales, requiring marketplace facilitators, referrers, and their sellers to collect and remit sales or use tax, or comply with notice and reporting requirements. It also extends B&O tax liability to businesses engaged in retail sales so long as they have more than $267,000 in receipts from Washington or at least 25 percent of total property, payroll or total receipts are in this state during the calendar year.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 2163: Relating to Revenue. Passed the Senate with amendments on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 33-16. on June 30, 2017
The Senate amendment implements the public utility tax on fuel extracted, manufactured, and consumed in petroleum production over four years beginning on January 1, 2018 and changes the distribution of public utility privilege tax revenues to the state and local government from June to the first business day of July.
Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2163: Relating to Revenue. House agreed to Senate amendments on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 51-42 (Five members excused). on June 30, 2017
Signed by the Governor on July 7, 2017.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5977: Relating to Revenue. Passed the Senate on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 33-16. on June 30, 2017
This bill, as passed, reduces the general manufacturing business and occupation tax rate and the processing for hire rate from 0.484 percent to 0.2904 percent over four years beginning in 2019. The bill also creates a business and occupation tax exemptions for agricultural fertilizer and seed; extends preferential business and occupation tax rates for manufacturers and wholesalers of specific solar energy material and parts and for manufacturers and processors for hire of semiconductor materials; provides sales and use tax exemptions to encourage coal-fired electric generation plants to convert to natural gas-fired plants or biomass energy facilities; extends the sales tax deferral on construction and expenditure costs of up to two new manufacturing facilities per calendar year; increases the business and occupation tax credit for qualifying activities to attract additional motion picture and film projects; and provides a leasehold excise tax credit to the University of Washington, Washington State University and community or technical colleges.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5977: Relating to Revenue. Passed the House on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 83-10 (Five members excused) on June 30, 2017
Partial veto on July 7, 2017. Governor Inslee vetoed the reduction in the general business and manufacturing tax rate as well as the tax exemption for coal-fired plants that convert to natural gas or biomass.
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5975: Relating to paid family and medical leave. Passed the Senate on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 37-12. on June 30, 2017
With passage of this bill, Washington joins four other states in providing for paid family medical leave, including childbirth, but Washington’s will be among the most generous, covering at least three months of leave, and providing at least 90 percent of low-wage workers’ weekly income. It is the only state plan that is not totally paid for by employee contributions. The bill provides for paid family leave, beginning January 1, 2020, of up to 12 weeks after the birth or placement of a child, to care for a family member with a serious health condition, or because of a military exigency. It also provides for paid medical leave, beginning January 1, 2020, of up to 12 weeks for an employee's serious health condition. It establishes a total premium of 0.40 percent of wages beginning on January 1, 2019, with employees paying 100 percent of the premium portion that is for family leave and 45 percent of the premium portion that is for medical leave. Employers are allowed to pay the employee's share of the premium.
Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5975: Relating to paid family and medical leave. Passed the House on June 30, 2017 by a vote of 65-29 (Four members excused). on June 30, 2017
Signed by the Governor on July 6, 2017.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5289: Modifying the infraction of and penalties for distracted driving. Passed the House on April 19, 2017 by a vote of 61-36, one member excused. on April 19, 2017
As passed, this bill would replace current laws that prohibit the use of a hand-held cellular phone and texting while driving with a prohibition on a driver using any personal electronic device with his or her hands while driving. It would permit minimal use of a finger to activate, deactivate, or initiate a function of a personal electronic device while driving. The bill also provides exceptions for contacting emergency services; uses by transit system employees; uses by commercial motor vehicle drivers; and the the operation of two-way or citizens band radio services. Distracted driving would be secondary traffic infraction under the bill, limiting enforcement to when a driver of a motor vehicle has been detained for a suspected violation of a separate traffic infraction.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5289: Modifying the infraction of and penalties for distracted driving. Final passage in the Senate on April 19, 2017 by a vote of 39-10. on April 19, 2017
The Senate agreed to the final version of the bill as passed by the House. The bill was delivered to the Governor on April 21, 2017 for approval.
Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2200: Protecting the privacy and security of internet users. Passed the House on April 19, 2017 by a vote of 87-10, one member excused. on April 19, 2017
This bill was first introduced on April 5th and would require broadband Internet providers to obtain opt-in consent to sell or transfer a customer’s personal information. It would also require providers to obtain permission from customers before sending or displaying advertisements to them that was selected based on the customer’s personal information, such as browsing or social media use. Providers of broadband Internet services would be required to have a mechanism for a customer to grant, deny, or withdraw approval to sell or transfer customer information, or to send or display an advertisement to a customer that was selected based on the customer's information. Under the bill, a provider would not be allowed to condition or refuse service as a consequence of a customer's refusal to waive privacy rights.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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This bill was also passed by both chambers earlier in the session, but the Senate refused to agree to amendments added by the House. The House receded from its initial amendments and re-passed the bill with another amendment that was accepted by the Senate. As passed, this bill would bring Washington state into compliance with the 2005 federal REAL ID act, which requires state driver’s licenses and identification cards to have special security features and to be issued only to people who can prove they’re in the US legally. Residents without the REAL ID enhancements on their driver’s licenses would need additional identification, such as a passport, to board commercial domestic flights, beginning on January 22, 2018. States that have been granted an extension would have to meet REAL ID requirements by October 21, 2020. Washington already offers, but does not mandate, an enhanced driver’s license at extra cost that would meet federal requirements.. Under the bill, the state would create a two-tier system, keeping the enhanced license and marking standard licenses as not valid for federal purposes.


The Senate, when it passed the bill earlier, had lowered the price of an enhanced license to $54, the cost of a standard license, but the House raised it back to its current price of $108. The House also added language prohibiting the standard licenses from being used to determine or infer the holder’s immigration or citizenship status. The compromise bill that was passed would set the cost of an enhanced license at $78 and also keeps changes made by House Democrats, including prohibiting the marked licenses from being used to determine or infer citizenship or immigration status or to spark an investigation or arrest that otherwise would not have occurred. The measure is on its way to the Governor for approval.


Senate Bill 5037: Making a fourth driving-under-the-influence offense a felony. Passed the House on April 20, 2017 by a vote of 85-11, two members excused. on April 20, 2017
This bill was passed by the Senate by a unanimous vote in February. It would raise the classification of Driving Under the Influence (DUI) of physical control of a vehicle (PC) from a gross misdemeanor to a felony upon the fourth, rather than the fifth, offense. In addition to other existing penalties, a $50 fee must be assessed to any person convicted, sentenced to a lesser charge, or given a deferred prosecution as a result of an arrest for a DUI, PC, Vehicular Homicide, or Vehicular Assault offense. Revenue from the $50 fee must be used to fund Washington Traffic Safety Commission grants to organizations within counties to reduce driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5096: Making transportation appropriations for the 2017-19 biennium. Passed the House on April 12, 2017 by a vote of 77-19, two members excused. on April 12, 2017
This is the amended version of the transportation budget that was passed a week ago by the Senate on a 49-0, unanimous vote. House members offered more than three-dozen amendments to the bill, a number of which were ruled out of order, because they dealt with Sound Transit related issues. According to the presiding Speaker Pro Temp’s ruling, these issues are beyond the scope of the bill as Sound Transit is not a state agency. The House version of the transportation budget provides $8.7 billion for the 2017-19 biennium, about $48 million more than the Senate version. Both versions include some $40 million in pay raises for Washington State Patrol troopers and officers, as negotiated in their collective bargaining agreements. A list of projects funded by this budget is available at www.fiscal.wa.gov. The bill now goes back to the Senate for concurrence on the House amendments and final passage.
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5289: Modifying the infraction of and penalties for distracted driving. Passed the House on April 12, 2017 by a vote of 63-35. on April 12, 2017
As amended by the House, this bill would replace current laws that prohibit the use of a hand-held cellular phone and texting while driving with a prohibition on a driver using any personal electronic device with his or her hands while driving. It would permit minimal use of a finger to activate, deactivate, or initiate a function of a personal electronic device while driving. The bill also provides exceptions for contacting emergency services; uses by transit system employees; uses by commercial motor vehicle drivers; and the the operation of two-way or citizens band radio services. Distracted driving would be secondary traffic infraction under the bill, limiting enforcement to when a driver of a motor vehicle has been detained for a suspected violation of a separate traffic infraction. The bill is headed back to the Senate for concurrence on the House amendments and final passage.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 2201: Concerning the collection of a motor vehicle excise tax approved by voters of a regional transit authority in 2016. Passed the House on April 12, 2017 by a vote of 64-33, one member excused. on April 12, 2017
Drastic increases in car-tab fees after Puget Sound voters approved Sound Transit’s $54 billion ST3 passage last November has sparked widely reported public outrage, because Sound Transit is using a valuation formula for collection of the Motor Vehicle Excise Tax that overvalues newer used cars. This bill would provide limited relief to vehicle owners by requiring Sound Transit to use the car valuation schedule established by law in 2006, instead of the 1996 schedule it uses currently. The newer schedule is more favorable to drivers. Under the bill, a car’s value would still be based on its original MSRP, not its current market value, but owners would get a tax credit on the difference between valuations under the old and newer formulas. Several amendments to the bill were proposed to base the formula on Kelley Blue Blook values, but failed to gain approval in the House. A week ago, the Senate narrowly passed SB 5893, which would require Sound Transit to use Kelley Blue Book or National Automobile Dealers Association values as a basis for its tax calculation. Both bills now go before the opposite chamber for approval.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5008: Facilitating compliance with the federal REAL ID act by modifying driver's license and identicard design and fees. Passed the House on April 11, 2017 by a vote of 69-28, one member excused. on April 11, 2017
This bill would bring Washington state into compliance with the 2005 federal REAL ID act, which requires state driver’s licenses and identification cards to have special security features and to be issued only to people who can prove they’re in the US legally. Residents without the REAL ID enhancements on their driver’s licenses would need additional identification, such as a passport, to board commercial domestic flights, beginning on January 22, 2018. States that have been granted an extension would have to meet REAL ID requirements by October 21, 2020. Washington already offers, but does not mandate, an enhanced driver’s license at extra cost that would meet federal requirements.. Under the bill, the state would create a two-tier system, keeping the enhanced license and marking standard licenses as not valid for federal purposes. The Senate, when it passed the bill last week, had lowered the price of an enhanced license to $54, the cost of a standard license, but the House raised it back to its current price of $108. The House also also added language prohibiting the standard licenses from being used to determine or infer the holder’s immigration or citizenship status. The bill was sent to the Senate for concurrence, but the Senate refused to agree to the House amendments and has asked the House to recede from its changes.
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 2182: Providing a tiered tax on the possession of hazardous substances. Passed the House on April 12, 2017 by a vote of 50-47, one member excused. on April 12, 2017
This bill would revise the Hazardous Substance Tax (HST)., establishing an annual tiered tax rate from 2018 through 2025. The tiered rates are as follows: 0.9 percent until HST revenues collected in the fiscal year reach $110 million; 0.7 percent until HST revenues collected in the fiscal year reach $170 million; and 0.21 percent until the first day of the next fiscal year. According to proponents of the bill, the goal of the policy is to create stability and have a defined band of revenues for Model Toxic Control Act (MTCA) accounts, as oil prices and fuel prices fluctuate. Opponents say this proposal would increase MTCA taxes over the next four years and that the tiered tax structure only lasts until the revenues begin decreasing. They say large reason for shortfalls is that the MTCA accounts are used to backfill the State General fund. Opponents testifying during committee hearings include the Washington Petroleum Institute and the Washington Farm Bureau, which represent businesses that pay the tax. The bill was sent to the Senate Ways and Means Committee for consideration.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5046: Providing public notices of public health, safety, and welfare in a language other than English. Passed the House on April 11, 2017 by a vote of 52-45, one member excused. on April 11, 2017
This bill would require state agencies and political subdivision to provide life safety information during an emergency or disaster in a language that can be understood by significant population segments with limited English proficiency, unless this is technologically infeasible. It would also require local organizations and joint local organizations for emergency management to include communication plans in their emergency management plans, that provide emergency notification in languages other than English. The bill is headed back to the Senate for concurrence of House amendments and final passage.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5893: Concerning the administration of motor vehicle excise taxes by regional transit authorities. Passed the Senate on April 6, 2017 by a vote of 25-24. on April 6, 2017
This bill would change the way regional transit authorities calculate the car tab increases approved by voters as part of Sound Transit’s $54 billion ST3 initiative. It would require Sound Transit officials to use Kelley Blue Book or National Automobile Dealers Association values, whichever is lower, to reflect the fair market value of vehicles for collecting car tab fees. The current formula, which uses drastically exaggerated vehicle values, has sparked widely reported public outrage over what amounts to a three-fold increase in current car tab fees.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5256: Concerning sexual assault protection orders. Passed the House on April 6, 2017 by a vote of 75-22, one member excused. on April 6, 2017
This bill provides that sexual assault protection orders may be permanent, rather than having a two-year maximum. It modifies the procedure for renewal of a sexual assault protection order to require renewal unless the respondent shows that he or she will not engage in or attempt contact with the petitioner after the order expires.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5382: Authorizing the issuance of identicards at a reduced cost to applicants who are under the age of eighteen and without a permanent residence address. Passed the House on April 6, 2017 by a vote of 70-27, one member excused. on April 6, 2017
An identicard is a Washington identification card (ID) issued by the Washington State Department of Licensing. The card is distinctively designed to avoid confusion with an official driver’s license and expires six years after it is issued.The fee is $54. Under this bill, people who are under the age of 18 and who do not have a primary residence address would be able to qualify to receive an identicard from the DOL at cost. The DOL would be required to determine what is or is not a permanent address by rule. The Senate passed the bill last month by a vote of 47-2.
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5356: Concerning the humane treatment of dogs. Passed the House on April 6, 2017 by a vote of 68-28, two members excused. on April 6, 2017
This bill provides for new restrictions on tethering dogs under Washington State animal cruelty laws. Current law does not specify penalties or animal cruelty standards when a dog is tied to fixed structures, ropes, chains, or trolley systems for extended periods of time without owner supervision. Under this bill, criminal liability principles for crimes related to animals would apply to inhumane tethering of dogs. It provides that an unsupervised dog must not be tethered for an amount of time that is reckless under the circumstances; any tethering restraint used must allow for safe and sanitary surroundings, adequate access to food and water, protection from excessive heat or cold, and shelter from the weather; and any tethered dog must have enough freedom of movement to comfortably sit, stand, lie down, and not risk entanglement in the restraint. The Senate passed this bill unanimously in February.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5472: Requiring ballot drop boxes in all communities. Passed the House on April 5, 2017 by a vote of 52-45, one member excused. on April 5, 2017
This bill provides that a county auditor must establish a minimum of one ballot drop box for each 15,000 registered voters in the county and in each city, town, and census-designated place in the county that has a post office. Under current law, county auditors are permitted to provide election services at locations in addition to ta required voting center, including additional ballot drop boxes. The services provided at the additional locations, and the days and hours the additional locations are open, are at the county auditor's discretion. The bill passed in the Senate unanimously in February.
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1100: Concerning concealed pistol license renewal notices. Passed the Senate on April 6, 2017 by a vote of 32-17. on April 6, 2017
This bill would require the Department of Licensing to mail a concealed pistol license (CPL) renewal notification to the license holder approximately 90 days prior to the expiration of the license. Currently, a CPL is valid for five years, and a CPL holder may renew the license by applying for renewal within 90 days before or after expiration of the license. License holders are not notified by the Department of Licensing or local authorities about an upcoming expiration. The House passed this bill in February by a unanimous vote.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5048: Making 2017-19 fiscal biennium operating appropriations. Passed the House on March 31, 2017 by a vote of 50-48. on March 31, 2017
This budget bill, passed by the Senate last week, was stripped and replaced by the contents of HB 1067, the House Democrats’ $44.9 billion 2017-19 state spending proposal. The state 2017-19 budget bill now includes appropriations of $22.0 billion for K-12 public schools; $5.9 billion for the Department of Social and Health Services; $8.2 billion for other human services programs, including the Health Care Authority and the Department of Corrections; and $3.8 billion for higher education institutions and financial aid. It would also fund the state employee and non-state employee pay raise agreements negotiated between the Governor and state employee unions last year, Initiative 732 cost-of-living adjustments, and additional K-12 salary increases. The bill would also provide supplemental appropriations in the current 2015-17 state budget, adding $1.6 million in total budgeted funds. The bill now goes back to the Senate for approval or rejection of the House amendments. If the amendments are rejected and the House insists on its position, the bill will go to a conference committee of members selected by leaders of both chambers to negotiate a final state budget measure.
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5086: SB 5086: Concerning the Capital Budget. Passed the Senate on March 30, 2017 by a vote of 49-0. on March 30, 2017
The Capital Budget generally includes appropriations for the acquisition, construction, and repair of capital assets such as land, buildings, and other infrastructure improvements. Funding for the Capital Budget is primarily from state general obligation bonds, with other funding derived from various dedicated taxes, fees, and state trust land revenues. This bill would authorize $3.98 billion in new capital construction projects for state agencies and institutions of higher education for the 2017-19 fiscal biennium. The proceeds of state general obligation bonds would fund $2.53 billion of the total appropriations. The bill also provides for a net decrease of $870,000 in adjustments to the current 2015-17 capital budget. It now heads to the House for consideration.
Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5130: Increasing marijuana license fees and adding a temporary additional fee on marijuana licenses issued by the Washington state liquor and cannabis board. Passed the Senate on March 31, 2017 by a vote of 35-10, four members excused. on March 31, 2017
The state Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB) has the authority to license and regulate marijuana businesses in Washington State. It issues licenses to marijuana producers, processors, retailers, and researchers. The fee for each license is currently set in statute at $1,000 for both the original application and each annual renewal. This bill would raise the licensing application and renewal fees for marijuana producers, processors, retailers, and researchers to $1,300, beginning on July 1, 2018. It would also impose a one-time nonrefundable additional fee of $480 on all marijuana license applications and modifications. The fee would apply to new license applications and all license renewals for licenses expiring on or after June 30, 2017. The one-time fee would expire on June 30, 2018. The LCB is would be required to use the revenue from this fee to replace the LCB's current electronic traceability system. The bill is now headed to the House for consideration.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted No'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Excused'
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Senate Bill 5048: Making 2017-19 fiscal biennium operating appropriations. Passed the Senate on March 23, 2017 by a vote of 25-24. on March 23, 2017
This is the two-year state operating budget proposed by the Republican-led Majority Coalition Caucus, creating a $43 billion spending plan that earmarks $21.9 billion for K-12 schools. It is the first time since 1993 that more than half the state’s budget would be allocated to education spending. If passed by both houses of the legislature and signed by the governor, the bill would take effect immediately. However, part of the funding for the plan is contingent on SB 5875, to replace local school levies with a statewide property tax levy for education, which contains a referendum clause requiring voter approval at the November 2017 state general election. House Democrats are expected to release their version of the budget early next week, setting the stage for extensive negotiations in the remaining month of this regular session.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5111: Enacting an excise tax on capital gains to provide for education funding. Motion to advance to Final Passage. Two-thirds vote (33) of the Senate required to pass. Failed on March 23, 2017 by a vote of 25-7 (17 members absent). on March 23, 2017
This bill would enact a tax on individuals for the privilege of selling or exchanging capital assets. The tax is equal to 7.9 percent multiplied by a person's Washington capital gains for each taxable year. A $25,000 threshold exemption would be allowed for individuals, or $50,000 for those filing joint returns. The tax is part of the Governor Inslee’s budget proposal for expanding state basic education funding. The roll call recorded here is on the motion to bring the bill to a vote by the whole Senate. A prior motion by Senate Democratic leadership to excuse members from the vote was rejected, resulting in members not voting and being listed as absent.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Not Voting'
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Senate Bill 5875: Relating to education. Passed the Senate on March 23, 2017 by a vote of 25-24. on March 23, 2017
This bill modifies elements of SB 5607, which passed the Senate earlier this session to replace the state's school funding model with a new allocation method that is based on a flat per-pupil allocation of dollars and creates the state "Local Effort Levy," a new regular state property tax that is deposited in the Education Legacy Trust Account. SB 5875 would lower the maximum local effort levy rate from $1.80 to $1.55 per $1,000 of assessed property valuation and guarantee local taxing districts full reimbursement for any negative fiscal impacts to their levy authority due to the local effort levy. It would also disallow a reduction in per pupil amounts when there is negative inflation. The bill contains a referendum clause requiring voter approval at the November 2017 state general election.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5898: Concerning eligibility for public assistance programs. Passed the Senate on March 23, 2017 by a vote of 25-24. on March 23, 2017
This bill deals with work activity and eligibility requirements for the WorkFirst temporary assistance for needy families program. It allows persons to receive Aged, Blind, or Disabled assistance benefits pending application for federal Supplemental Security Income for up to 36 months. Applicants for the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program would be required to demonstrate that a job search has been conducted prior to applying for assistance. The bill would establish that individuals who experience a non-temporary change in their status as working or attending a job training or education program under the Working Connections Child Care program must be discontinued from the program after a minimum of three months. This program pays part of the cost of childcare when a parent is employed, self-employed, or meets the requirements for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families or WorkFirst programs.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5033: Concerning financing essential public infrastructure. Passed the Senate on March 23, 2017 by a vote of 26-23. on March 23, 2017
This bill would improve access to and reliability of low-cost financing for local government infrastructure projects by authorizing public works bonds. It would permit the state to issue bonds for local infrastructure projects pooled by the Public Works Board. This debt would enjoy the full faith and credit of the state, but would not be subject to the state constitutional debt limit if the constitutional amendment SJR 8201, allowing the state to guarantee debt issued to local governments for infrastructure projects is passed by the legislature and adopted by voters this fall. If SJR 8201 is not adopted, the bill would authorize the WA State Housing Finance Commission to offer an infrastructure borrowing program.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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House Bill 1661: Creating the department of children, youth, and families. Passed the House on March 15, 2017 by a vote of 77-19, two members excused. on March 15, 2017
This bill would create a new state agency, the Department of Children, Youth, and Families (DCYF), to replace the current Department of Early Learning beginning July 1, 2018. The stated intent of creating this new agency is to improve the delivery of services and the outcomes for children and families by incorporating early learning, child welfare, and juvenile justice services in the same agency. The DCYF would be required to establish outcome measure goals and report to the Legislature on these outcome measures and progress toward these goals annually.
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5312: Prohibiting employers from obtaining criminal background information from job applicants until after the employer determines they are otherwise qualified. Passed the Senate on March 7, 2017 by a vote of 25-24. on March 7, 2017
This measure would create the “Washington Fair Chance Act,” under which employers would be prohibited from making inquiries related to criminal records until after initially determining a job applicant is otherwise qualified for a position. It would also prohibit employment ads or general policies that exclude applicants with criminal records. The bill would preempt the entire field of employment laws related to criminal records, repealing local laws and ordinances that are inconsistent with the act. The state Attorney General would be authorized to enforce the act.
Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted No'
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Senate Bill 5433: Concerning informed decision making for death with dignity decisions. Passed the Senate on March 7, 2017 by a vote of 26-23. on March 7, 2017
Washington enacted its Death with Dignity law by initiative in 2008. Under current law, terminally ill adults who want to end their life may request a prescription for a lethal dose of medication. Terminally ill means that in the physician's reasonable medical judgment, the patient has an incurable and irreversible disease that will result in death within the next six months. The bill would preserves the option for terminally ill patients to request a lethal dose of medication to end their life, but clarifies and updates statutory language to require the treating physician to inform a terminally ill patient about all feasible alternatives to life ending medication, including comfort care, hospice care, pain control, treatment for the purpose of cure, and treatment for the purpose of extending the patient's life. Treating physicians would be required to comply with Washington State's standard of care when counseling a terminally ill patient who requests a life-ending dose of medication.
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville) (R) 'Voted Yes'
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Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island) (D) 'Voted No'
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Contact my lawmakers
Rep. Dan Kristiansen (Snohomish), District 39. (360)-786-7967. kristiansen.dan@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Pat Sullivan (Covington), District 47. (360) 786-7858. sullivan.pat@leg.wa.gov
Sen. Sharon Nelson (Maury Island), District 34. (360) 786-7667. nelson.sharon@leg.wa.gov
Sen. Mark Schoesler (Ritzville), District 9. (360) 786-7620. schoesler.mark@leg.wa.gov



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